OH, How Magnificent! Prison Art Resources

Saturday, August 10, 2013

#TheBLACKTEAParty 's LETTER TO PRESIDENT OBAMA_Chris Christie's prison labor makes for higher private sector unemployment.

Banking on Bondage: Private Prisons and Mass Incarceration | American Civil Liberties Union: "The federal government is in the midst of a private prison expansion spree, driven primarily by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), an agency that locks up roughly 400,000 immigrants each year and spends over $1.9 billion annually on custody operations. ICE now intends to create a new network of massive immigration detention centers, managed largely by private companies, in states including New Jersey, Texas, Florida, California and Illinois. According to a news report, in August 2011, ICE's plans to send 1,250 immigration detainees to Essex County, New Jersey threatened to unravel amid allegations that a private prison company seeking the contract, whose executives enjoyed close ties to Governor Chris Christie, received "special treatment" from the county. The fiscal crisis confronting the federal government, however, has done nothing to dampen Washing


Date: AUGUST 2013

Barack Obama
President of the United States of America
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20500
LETTER TO THE PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA
SUBJRCT: Rising prison labor has taken jobs from the private sector, resulting in higher unemployment.

Dear President Obama,

WONDER WHERE THE JOBS ARE?
Flush with billions in bailout money and an economic system designed to siphon wealth from the working class to the idle rich, Wells Fargo has been busy expanding its stake in the GEO Group, the second largest private jailer in America.
Rising prison labor has taken jobs from the private sector, resulting in higher unemployment.
Incarceration is a path to wealth for shareholders in prison industry corporations because, the greatest Doctors, Lawyers, Dentists, Architects, Engineers, Artists, Musicians, Poets, Philosophers, Teachers, Cooks, Seamstress’, Designers, unlimited are kept in cages. 




 Teachers identify them by third grade, suggest to the parents to beat them like a slaver would and when done, calls the police on the parent and the child is taken away; later held in cages for profit, alleged to be guilty of crimes of: 

Drugs 50.7% Public-order 35.0%, Violent 7.9% Property 5.8% Other .7%. 1.8 million are NEGUS Black people- the building blocks of wealth for 30 percent of White families.

Tens of thousands of US inmates are paid from pennies to minimum wage—minus fines and victim compensation—for everything from grunt work to firefighting to specialized labor. Each month, California inmates process more than 680,000 pounds of beef, 400,000 pounds of chicken products, 450,000 gallons of milk, 280,000 loaves of bread, and 2.9 million eggs (from 160,000 inmate-raised hens).
The Fact That Prison Slave Labor Can Cut Costs And Generate Revenue Has Never Been A Secret. Private Businesses Nationwide Are Vying To Exploit Prisoner Workers To Reduce Operating Expenses And Gain A Competitive Advantage, While Government Agencies Are Increasingly Using Prisoners For Jobs That Otherwise Would Go To Public Employees Or Contractors. Even Farmers Have Turned To Prison Labor To Harvest Their Crops.
Expansion Of Prison Labor
For As Long As There Have Been Prisons There Have Been Prisoner Work Crews. The Only Class Of People Who May Be Forced Into Slave Labor Under The U.S. Constitution Are Prisoners, As The 13th Amendment Expressly Permits And Forever Enshrines Slavery “As A Punishment For Crime Whereof The Party Shall Have Been Duly Convicted.” As The American Penal System Has Evolved Since The Demise Of The Convict Leasing System In The Early 1900s, The Use Of Prison Labor Has Been Mostly Confined To Making License Plates, Manufacturing Office Furniture, Landscaping, Maintenance Of Government Buildings, And Picking Up Trash And Cutting Grass Along Roadsides:
And Now, 
It is time to say
 NO MORE!
We WON’T GO!








These sadists don’t really care what color you are:
Corrections Corporation of America, the nation’s largest operator of for-profit prisons, has sent letters recently to 48 states offering to buy up their prisons as a remedy for “challenging corrections budgets.” In exchange, the company is asking for a 20-year management contract, plus an assurance that the prison would remain at least 90 percent full, according to
An assurance by the agency partner that the agency has sufficient inmate population to maintain a minimum 90 percent occupancy rate over the term of the contract is needed.

*  Boeing (NYSE: BA);
Lockheed Martin,
General Dynamics (NYSE: GD);
Raytheon;
Wells Fargo’s prison cash cow
McDonnell Douglas/
Boeing’s F-15 fighter aircraft;
General Dynamics/
Lockheed Martin’s F-16s;
Bell/
Textron’s Cobra helicopter;
Victoria’s Secret;
JC Penny;

*  HP;

*  IBM;

*  Dell;

*  Escod Industries;

*  UNICOR; and the


   GEO GROUP, THE SECOND LARGEST PRIVATE JAILER IN AMERICA.

A driving force behind the push for ever-tougher sentences is the for-profit prison industry, in which Wells Fargo is a major investor. Flush with billions in bailout money from this administration and an economic system designed to siphon wealth from the working class to the idle rich, Wells Fargo has been busy expanding its stake in the GEO Group, the second largest private jailer in America. At the end of 2011, Wells Fargo was the company’s second-largest investor, holding 4.3 million shares valued at more than $72 million. By March 2012, its stake had grown to more than 4.4 million shares worth $86.7 million.
Definition of NEGUS: king —used as a title of the sovereign of Ethiopia
NOTE: Often miss spoken and interchanged with the slang term ‘nigger’ or ‘nigga’ to undermine and disassociate the true kings and original man of the earth from their truth. ‪#‎MESSAGE‬‬‬!
“These partnerships are causing problems with labor and competition with non-PIE companies trying to stay in the market,” said Robert Sloan, a prison industry expert and consultant. “For example, Escod Industries manufactures wiring harnesses and cabling for HP, IBM, Dell and other companies. They are using inmate labor for that manufacturing at a South Carolina plant. The use of inmate labor gives them an edge over their competitors.”
Although PIE has been hailed as a “training” program that provides prisoners with job skills they can use following their release, it is questionable whether such skills actually translate to job opportunities for former prisoners. One PIE program involving Wilson Sports, for example, consisted of prisoners inflating basketballs – a “skill” with limited utility in the outside job market.
“What good is the [PIE] program if the very companies taking advantage of it by claiming they’re ‘training’ inmates for employment upon release don’t hire those inmates after they get out?” asked Sloan. “The program is simply being abused by all involved – as is the practice of using inmates to replace public sector workers at the state, county and municipal levels.” 
In April 2012, the Alabama legislature passed a bill (SB63) that would allow private businesses to partner with the state’s Department of Corrections and use prison labor 




through PIE programs. Thirty-eight other state prison systems authorize PIE programs, which employ approximately 5,000 prisoners nationwide.
While prison slave labor is usually touted as saving money, it may actually harm the local economy. “When a prisoner gets a job performing work in the community or in a prison industry program, they’re taking a job from someone else,” said PLN editor Paul Wright. 
“[E]stimate how many civilian workers could be employed by each state participating in this kind of ‘partnership’ using prison labor,” added Sloan. “Inmates are working in their place all across the country, displacing those who need jobs to feed their families and [put] a roof over their heads.”
As one example, when Brown County, Wisconsin began using prisoners to cut the lawn at Sheriff’s Office properties, the company previously contracted to do that work, Lizer Lawn Care, lost a $13,000 annual contract. 
In December 2011, a Tennessee-based company, Tennier Industries, learned that it had lost a $45 million contract to produce clothing for the Department of Defense (DOD). 
Who won the contract? Federal Prison Industries, better known as UNICOR – which operates industry programs for the Bureau of Prisons. Prisoners employed with UNICOR earn from $.23 to $1.15 per hour, and it’s hard for freeworld businesses to compete with such low prison labor costs. Tennier had to lay off around 100 workers after losing the DOD contract.
“Our government screams, howls and yells how the rest of the world is using prisoners or slave labor to manufacture items, and here we take the items right out of the mouths of people who need it,” said Steven Eisen, Tennier’s chief financial officer.
In our nation’s free market economy, however, where both the supply of prisoners and the demand for cheap labor are high, the use of prison slave labor at the expense of freeworld workers is only likely to expand. However, prison slavery has its limits and there are sound reasons that slavery is no longer the dominant mode of production in the world today. Slaves are not efficient workers and represent an investment for the slave owner, whether the state or an individual. Given the massive need for farm workers, it is doubtful that prisoners will be able to meet that need anytime soon. The other option, decent working conditions and a  


living wage, which might entice Americans back into the fields a la Grapes of Wrath days, appears to be unlikely.

CCA in 2010 reiterates the importance of influencing legislation:
“The demand for our facilities and services could be adversely affected by the relaxation of enforcement efforts, leniency in conviction or parole standards and sentencing practices or through the decriminalization of certain activities that are currently proscribed by our criminal laws. For instance, any changes with respect to drugs and controlled substances or illegal immigration could affect the number of persons arrested, convicted, and sentenced, thereby potentially reducing demand for correctional facilities to house them. Legislation has been proposed in numerous jurisdictions that could lower minimum sentences for some non-violent crimes and make more inmates eligible for early release based on good behavior. Also, sentencing alternatives under consideration could put some offenders on probation with electronic monitoring who would otherwise be incarcerated. Similarly, reductions in crime rates or resources dedicated to prevent and enforce crime could lead to reductions in arrests, convictions and sentences requiring incarceration at correctional facilities.”
Considering today’s private prison population is over 17 times larger than the figure two decades earlier, the malleability of the judicial system under corporate influence is clear. The Corrections Corporation of America is the first and largest private prison company in the US, cofounded in 1983 by Tom Beasley, former Chairman of the Tennessee Republican Party. The CCA entered the market and overtly exploited Beasley’s political connections in an attempt to exert control over the entire prison system of Tennessee. Today, the company operates over sixty-five facilities and owns contracts with the US Marshal Service, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the Bureau of Prisons. The GEO Group operates 118 detention centers throughout the United States, South Africa, UK, Australia and elsewhere. Under its original name, the Wackenhut Corrections Corporation was synonymous for the sadistic abuse of prisoners in its facilities, resulting in the termination of several contracts in 1999.
The political action committees assembled by private prison enterprises have also wielded incredible influence with respect to administering harsher immigration legislation. The number of illegal immigrants being incarcerated inside the United States is rising exponentially under Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), an agency responsible 






living wage, which might entice Americans back into the fields a la Grapes of Wrath days, appears to be unlikely.
CCA in 2010 reiterates the importance of influencing legislation:
“The demand for our facilities and services could be adversely affected by the relaxation of enforcement efforts, leniency in conviction or parole standards and sentencing practices or through the decriminalization of certain activities that are currently proscribed by our criminal laws. For instance, any changes with respect to drugs and controlled substances or illegal immigration could affect the number of persons arrested, convicted, and sentenced, thereby potentially reducing demand for correctional facilities to house them. Legislation has been proposed in numerous jurisdictions that could lower minimum sentences for some non-violent crimes and make more inmates eligible for early release based on good behavior. Also, sentencing alternatives under consideration could put some offenders on probation with electronic monitoring who would otherwise be incarcerated. Similarly, reductions in crime rates or resources dedicated to prevent and enforce crime could lead to reductions in arrests, convictions and sentences requiring incarceration at correctional facilities.”
Considering today’s private prison population is over 17 times larger than the figure two decades earlier, the malleability of the judicial system under corporate influence is clear. The Corrections Corporation of America is the first and largest private prison company in the US, cofounded in 1983 by Tom Beasley, former Chairman of the Tennessee Republican Party. The CCA entered the market and overtly exploited Beasley’s political connections in an attempt to exert control over the entire prison system of Tennessee. Today, the company operates over sixty-five facilities and owns contracts with the US Marshal Service, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the Bureau of Prisons. The GEO Group operates 118 detention centers throughout the United States, South Africa, UK, Australia and elsewhere. Under its original name, the Wackenhut Corrections Corporation was synonymous for the sadistic abuse of prisoners in its facilities, resulting in the termination of several contracts in 1999.
The political action committees assembled by private prison enterprises have also wielded incredible influence with respect to administering harsher immigration legislation. The number of illegal immigrants being incarcerated inside the United States is rising exponentially under Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), an agency responsible 

for annually overseeing the imprisonment of 400,000 foreign nationals at the cost of over $1.9 billion on custody-related operations. The agency has come under heavy criticism for seeking to contract a 1,250-bed immigration detention facility in Essex County, New Jersey to a private company that shares intimate ties to New Jersey’s Governor, Chris Christie. Given the private prison industry’s dependence on immigration-detention contracts, the huge contributions of the prison lobby towards drafting Arizona’s recrementitious immigration law SB 1070 are all but unexpected. While the administration of Arizona’s Governor Jan Brewer is lined with former private prison lobbyists, its Department of Corrections budget has been raised by $10 million, while all other Arizona state agencies are subject to budget cuts in 2012’s fiscal year.
Perhaps the most disturbing aspect of this obstinate moral predicament presents itself in the private contracting of prisoners and their role in assembling vast quantities of military and commercial equipment. While the United States plunges itself into each new manufactured conflict under a wide range of fraudulent pretenses, it is interesting to note that all military helmets, ammunition belts, bulletproof vests, ID tags, uniforms, tents, bags and other equipment used by military occupation forces are produced by inmates in federal prisons across the US. Giant multinational conglomerates and weapons manufacturers such as Lockheed Martin and Raytheon Corporation employ federal prison labor to cheaply assemble weapons components, only to sell them to the Pentagon at premium prices. At the lowest, Prisoners earn 17 cents an hour to assemble high-tech electronic components for guided missile systems needed to produce Patriot Advanced Capability 3 missiles and anti-tank projectiles.
In the past, political mouthpieces of the United States have criticized countries such as China and North Korea for their role in exploiting prisoner labor to create commodity products such as women’s bras and artificial flowers for export. Evidently, outsourcing the construction of the military equipment responsible for innumerable civilian causalities to the prisons of America warrants no such criticism from the military industrial establishment. In utter derision toward the integrity of the common worker, prison inmates are exposed to toxic spent ammunition, depleted uranium dust and other chemicals when contracted to clean and reassemble tanks and military vehicles returned from combat. Prison laborers receive no union protection, benefits or health and safety protection when made to work in







electronic recycling factories where inmates are regularly exposed to lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic.

In addition to performing tasks that can result in detrimental illnesses, prison labor produces other military utilities such as night-vision goggles, body armor, radio and communication devices, components for battleship anti-aircraft guns, land mine sweepers and electro-optical equipment. While this abundant source of low-cost manpower fosters greater incentives for corporate stockholders to impose draconian legislation on the majority of Americans who commit nonviolent offenses, it’s hard to imagine such an innately colossal contradiction to the nation’s official rhetoric, i.e. American values. Furthermore, prison labor is employed not only in the assembly of complex components used in F-15 fighter jets and Cobra helicopters, it also supplies 98% of the entire market for equipment assembly services, with similar statistics in regard to products such as paints, stoves, office furniture, headphones, and speakers.
It is some twisted irony that large sections of the workforce in America’s alleged free-market are shackled in chains. Weapons manufactured in the isolation of America’s prisons are the source of an exploitative cycle, which leaves allied NATO member countries indebted to a multibillion-dollar weapons industry at the behest of the U.S. State Department and the Pentagon. Complete with its own trade exhibitions, mail-order catalogs and investment houses on Wall Street, the eminence of the private prison industry solidifies the ongoing corrosion of American principles – principles that seem more abstract now, than the day they were written.

Sincerely,
Algebra Works
#TheBlackTeaParty




































'

via Blog this'

ALGEBRA OUR WAY TODAY  Algebra Our Way By Third Frade Baby Introducing baby to algebra as early as the baby shower via algebra themed baby beginnings, such as:mobiles, room plaques, pacifiers and other baby algebra paraphernalia,we inundate baby with the message that algebra is important to baby and family tradition.Baby algebra uses pictures and key words to help Baby to generalize and grasp algebra concepts. Therefore we can think our way through the stepping stones called tests. Colors and images react . Colors with one side of the brain, images with the other side of the brain, together create and complete the learning process inherent at birth . WALLA! Baby does algebra.
Post a Comment